Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Tempest

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Water Damage, Poem, Weathercast

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Ttukseom Public Pool, Seoul

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Children’s Book with Drops of Rain

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Couple in Plastic Raincoats, Seongsan Ilchulbong, Jeju-do

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Cosmetic Face Mask with Cigarette Bundle

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Children Playing Beneath a Statue of Admiral Yi Sun-Sin

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Calligraphy Waterfall

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Live Telecast of President Park Geun-Hye

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Missionaries, Hyanggyo Confucian School, Jeonju

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Gowoodang Occupation Era House, Gunsan

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Woman Sheltering From Rainfall

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Flower Display, Busan

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.

Weighing the Rain

Weighing the Rain

Damaged Mural, Jaman-dong, Jeonju

The Weighing the Rain is a series of projects that, in varied ways, use the monsoon season as a symbolic point of departure in contemplating the physical and social landscape of South Korea. The images in this portfolio rely on photography’s descriptive language, creating thematic vignettes formed through image editing, sequencing, and the physical gallery installation. 

Within these scenes, the presence of the weather evokes a unique intensity that has permeated into contemporary society. Borne out of decades of rapid post-war development, the fall into a late 90s economic crisis, and the rise of the “Hallyu” wave that has brought Korea into widespread political and pop culture consciousness, the intensity that drives the country’s pace, productivity, and success is confounding and dizzying.

For a small country that has transformed itself into a political, technological, economic, culinary, and cultural powerhouse, the progress made has also levied a toll. Workers and students exist in a highly competitive environment that drives them to long hours on the job and  at school. Marriage and birth rates are currently stagnating at an all time low. Korea ranks near the bottom of 145 countries in gender equality. Households are leveraged on some of the highest levels and fastest growing debt in the world. And, in contrast to its rise in global prominence and impact, for the past decade Korea has also suffered through some of the highest rates of suicide and depression in the industrialized world. 

Led by these currents, the photographs in Weighing the Rain were taken on three trips in the summers of 2012, 2014, and 2016 and extend into the northern, southern, eastern, and western reaches of the country. The scenes press into one another, drawing attention to the confluence of past and present; the scale and density of the urban environment; the respite of the natural landscape; a steep imbalance of gender roles; careful preservation of tradition; the obsessive pursuit of aesthetic perfection; immersion in materialistic culture; the comfort and confines of a collective ideology; and moments of everyday life and labor that quietly suggest sentiments of desire, struggle, and tranquility.