Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Hotel, Man and Woman Kissing, Three Passersby

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Man, Makeup, Dress Strap, Curl of Hair

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Two Boys in Backwards Baseball Caps, White Fence, Orange Lights

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Three Silhouettes, The Sea

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Man, Baby, Woman, Gravel Driveway, a White House with One Open Window

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Bare Pine Tree, Rocks, Inlet on the Ocean

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Man and Girl in Helmets, Motorcycle, Basketball Hoop, Outstretched Hand

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Boy with Hands in Pockets, Saplings, Kent State Sweatshirt, Peak of a House

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.

Plain Sight

Plain Sight

Woman in an Ornate Buttoned Shirt, Round Glasses, Large Teeth

Plain Sight was motivated by curiosity and a desire to create a new relationship to the photographic image. After researching various architecturally-oriented processes for a previous project, I became interested in the way photogrammetry software, which is typically used to create three-dimensional models of physical spaces by comparing and measuring the details across a set of similar images, handles photographic information. While relying on the camera’s fundamental ability to accurately record surface detail, it simultaneously cannibalizes that information into abstract mathematical data. Through this translation, the indexical language of photography is erased and the subject becomes plagued by an emptiness that results from lacking one of the medium’s essential characteristics.

To most pointedly enact a dialogue between photography’s past and a potential future, I pictured people holding photographs from their own collections that are of personal significance. The array of imagery captured by the camera is then stitched together and the memories, stories, and events contained therein are specified only in the titling of each image, as an inventory of its contents. As photography moves further away from the real in unexpected and technologically driven ways, I am curious how our physical and psychological relationship to the medium shifts and how its role in constituting our experience of the world and our history also evolves. These images serve as a discussion point where the well established traditions of photography are re-envisioned within a new form of photographic image making.