Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Untitled #1 (Overlooking Nürnberg, Bavaria from Sinwell Tower)

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Schematic #1Overlooking Nürnberg, Bavaria from Sinwell Tower

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Untitled #2 (Schloßgarten Park, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg)

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Schematic #2: Schloßgarten Park, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Untitled #5 (Rhine River, Rhineland-Palatinate)

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Schematic #5: Rhine River, Rhineland-Palatinate

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Untitled #11, (Siebengebirge, Bad Honnef)

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Schematic #11: Siebengebirge, Bad Honnef

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Untitled #10, (Birkenkopf, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg)

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Schematic #10: Birkenkopf, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

12 laser-etched film negatives, film roll, and packaging

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Array of 12 cyanotypes printed from laser-etched negatives

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.

Partial Architectures

Partial Architectures

Installation at INOVA, Milwaukee, WI, 2012

The German landscapes in the series Partial Architectures are uneasily occupied by abstract formations. Their appearance suggests that they may be architectural vestiges, monuments, or, perhaps, ultimately unknowable aberrations.

Partial Architectures began with a roll of film shot by my grandfather when he was stationed as an American serviceman in Germany during World War II. The film, undeveloped, returned home with him and sat untouched for nearly seventy years until it was found and developed shortly before his passing. However, the processed reel returned only a dense blackness, evidence of its exposure to light and time.

The absence of those photographs, along with the history and familial memory tied to them, led me through Germany to retrace my grandfather’s movements while photographing the present day landscape. My travel took me to locations identified in a small collection of other photographs my grandfather took, which depicted the ruins of cities and towns leveled by bombings. These photographs then served as direct visual references for a series of drawn architectural diagrams that extrapolated from the ruins depicted and imagined the portions of buildings that had been destroyed.

This was the initial step in a sequence of processes that represents a strained attempt to translate the emptiness of the original negatives into something tangible and real. The architectural drawings were then laser-etched into the original strip of negatives, which was contact printed as a series of cyanotypes, a photogrpahic process that was also used to create architectural blueprints. Those same forms were then computer modeled and made into physical objects through a three-dimensional printing process. Now existing in tangible form, the imagined fragments of common buildings on the verge of destruction were re-photographed and digitally composited into my own documentation of the German landscape. These various iterations create a multi-layered document that conflates fact, fiction, history, and experience across geography and generations.

What began as a personal search to illuminate a piece of family history, became a project that explores the reconfiguration of notions of memory, time, and place taking place through new technologies.