I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (cul-de-sac)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (buzzards)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (field)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (Nighthawks)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (now hiring)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (dust)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (wall)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (white flag)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (monument)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (doll house)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (theater)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (mailboxes)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

I'm in the Wrong Film

I'm in the Wrong Film

Untitled (palm)

The title of this work, I’m in the Wrong Film, is a colloquialism spoken when one’s surroundings have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of photographic tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

In these scenarios, an ineffective everyman wanders in and out of constructed environments suggestive of a nondescript Middle American landscape. Their staging references theater or silent film, wherein a false décor foregrounds the actor’s performance. This artifice underscores each scene, establishing a physical distance and psychological separation between the character and the place to which he belongs.

The character’s lack of agency, the very real narrative of post-industrial decline, and the faltering false construction of the photographs themselves compound upon one another in describing both the desire and the absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.