Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

Installation at Southern Oregon University, 2008

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

(detail)

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

(detail)

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

(detail)

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

(detail)

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

Installation Detail

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Gone to Seed

Installation Detail

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.

Gone to Seed

Video Documentation

Gone to Seed is a large-scale photographic and video installation. The panorama depicts a continuous “Main Street” scene through an imagined small town. Located in the center is a fallow field, in which a rear video projection shows a ghostly character watering the land.

The expression “gone to seed” refers to the stage of development in which a crop has exhausted its potential and become weak and devitalized, implying carelessness and neglect as the catalyst of decline. The action of the character, as he attempts to rejuvenate a dying landscape, is a seemingly futile, yet hopeful gesture that speaks to the need to invest and tend to places and communities left behind by changing economies and politics.

The form of this piece is largely informed by panorama theaters of the 19th century. Similar to photography, panorama theaters were a medium that allowed people to question and reimagine their sense of place in the world. Coinciding with the rapid growth of the city, the panorama offered a privileged and empowering overview of the urban space, in which the chaos of the built environment was organized around the viewer.

In Gone to Seed the panorama is transplanted to a rural setting, surveying a landscape that has become disfigured by economic decline rather than rapid growth. The conventionally picturesque panorama and the balance, hierarchies, and absence of imperfection that characterize its form are instead disrupted by the disorder of rural decline.